Exploring Dublin

A guide to Dublin’s universities and colleges

by stephaniehiggins
06 December · 2 min read
Trinity College Dublin

You are coming to Dublin to discover the city of Samuel Beckett, James Joyce, Oscar Wilde or WB Yeates, then you should know that they have shared educational roots that can be traced right back in Dublin. To help you understand these higher-education institutions we have written a small introduction about most of them. Keep an eye on Dublin hotels special offers to be sure to find the best deals.

Trinity College Dublin

Founded in 1592, Trinity College is one of the best universities in the world and is consistently ranked in the top 1% of institutions worldwide. Its global reputation attracts a vibrant, diverse, and supportive international community of almost 17,000 students and 2,860 members of staff. The campus itself is world famous because of its historic buildings and cobblestone walkways. With over 200 sports clubs and societies ranging from athletics to tennis, debating to investing, and drama to science fiction, there is something to suit everyone’s interest.

Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland (RCSI)

Created in 1784, RCSI has long played a major role in medical education and training in Ireland. The college is now providing extensive education and training in the healthcare professions at undergraduate and postgraduate level. The school is the largest in the country and is one of the world’s leading international medical schools. Located in the city centre just next to the O’Callaghan Stephen’s Green Hotel, RCSI is one of the best places to study in Dublin.

National College of Art and Design (NCAD)

Being the only Irish university institution specialising in art and design and that since 1746, has brought NCAD to a unique position in this field of education in Ireland. It offered to 950 full-time students last year a broad range of Art and Design degrees at undergraduate and postgraduate level.

University College Dublin (UCD)

It became University College Dublin in 1908, before that it was called the Catholic University of Ireland. This university is famous because of its help to create modern Ireland, through its students and staff who participated in the struggle for Irish independence. Numerous Irish Presidents and Taoisigh (Prime Ministers) have studied here but perhaps the most well-known of all UCD alumni is the writer James Joyce, who completed his Bachelor of Arts in 1902.

Dublin City University

DCU is a new university known for its cutting-edge and forward-thinking approach to higher education. The university is focusing on the expectations of today’s companies and provides an up-to-date curriculum to its students. Its students range from those fresh out of school to those completing their PhDs and they are all happy with the excellent employability statistics of graduates.